Why are the doors locked when a division is held?

Thanks for your question.

During a division – a coulnted vote in the Australian Parliament – , members of parliament move to either side of the Presiding Officer's chair to show how they are voting. Senators and members of the House of Representatives sitting on either side of the President of the Senate's or Speaker of the House of Representatives' chair are counted and the results are recorded.

The doors are locked so there is no confusion during the count caused by senators or members entering or leaving the room. Those who are in the room are counted; those who are locked out are not counted.

A woman and a man stand on either side of the Clerk's table in the Senate. There are people sitting at the central table.

Party whips counting the votes in a division in the Senate.

DPS Auspic

Party whips counting the votes in a division in the Senate.

A woman and a man stand on either side of the Clerk's table in the Senate. There are people sitting at the central table.

DPS Auspic

Description

A woman and a man stand on either side of the Clerk's table in the Senate. There are people sitting at the central table.