who came up with australia's form of government?

Australia became a nation on 1 January 1901 when the 6 colonies—New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia and Western Australia and Tasmania—decided to federate – unite. Through Federation, the states transferred some of their law-making power to the Australian Parliament.

The Australian Constitution, which outlines our form of government, was drafted at a series of conventions – meetings – attended by representatives of the colonies. These conventions were held between 1891 and 1898. The Constitution was then approved by a vote of the people in referendums held in each colony between June 1899 and July 1900. In deciding Australia’s system of government, the drafters of the Constitution were influenced by both the Westminster tradition of the British Parliament and by the federal model that existed in the United States. As a result, Australia’s system of government is often referred to as ‘Washminster’.

A sepia-toned formal portrait of a group of men in formal attire.

Members of the Australasian Federation Convention, 1890.

National Library of Australia, AN14292110

Members of the Australasian Federation Convention, 1890.

A sepia-toned formal portrait of a group of men in formal attire.

National Library of Australia, AN14292110

Description

A sepia toned photograph of a group of men in formal attire in front of a portico of a building. Six men (including Edmund Barton, fourth from left in the top hat) are seated on chairs. Eight men stand behind. Henry Parkes is fourth from left and Alfred Deakin is sixth from left.